Friday, February 17, 2017

723-724 (2017 #21-22). Two "Lowriders" Graphic Novels

by Cathy Camper, 
illustrated by Raul the Third

I'm not really into graphic novels, but Lowriders in Space was on the 2016-2017 Texas Bluebonnet Award reading list (it did not win the award, though), and the illustrator (Raul The Third, aka Raúl Gonzalez III, who grew up in El Paso) recently won the 2017 Pura Belpré Illustrator Award for the sequel, Lowriders to the Center of the Earth.  This award is "presented annually to a Latino/Latina ... illustrator whose work best portrays, affirms, and celebrates the Latino cultural experience in an outstanding work of literature for children and youth."  The illustrations are all done in red, blue, green, and black ballpoint pen ink on light brown paper and are incredibly detailed.

I was also pleasantly surprised to learn that author Cathy Camper is a K-12 outreach librarian with the Multnomah County Library system in the Portland, Oregon area.  In an interview, she said, “When I came up with the idea for Lowriders, I had three goals: To publish a book that would connect with English-Spanish speakers...To create a book that would appeal to boys since boys’ literacy rate was dropping...To connect with kids who loved comics and graphic novels.”

The books feature a female impala mechanic named Lupe Impala, a mosquito named Elirio Malaria who paints and details cars with his proboscis (beak), and El Chavo "Flappy" Flapjack, an octopus who cleans and buffs the cars.  The character names are clever - Chevy Impalas are popular models for lowriders, malaria is a disease spread by mosquitoes, and there really is a flapjack octopus.

In the first book (Space), these three work at the Cantinflas used car dealership, but long to have a garage of their own.  They use all their extra time and money to build a lowrider to enter into a competition - but some of the parts come from an old airplane factory, and their test ride takes them into outer space.  The second book (Earth) takes them deep inside the earth on a hunt for their missing cat, where they encounter Mictlantecuhtli, the Aztec god of the underworld.

These two books reminded me a lot of Joanna Cole's old Magic School Bus series, specifically, the Lost in the Solar System and Inside the Earth books.  Both series manage to work in a little science along with the fantasy story.  The Lowriders books have a glossary at the end with definitions of Spanish and science terms, as well as explanatory notes about lowriders (Space) and Aztec and other cultural references (Earth).  Both books also translate Spanish terms within the stories with asterisked footnotes.

While aimed at middle-grade kids, even adults who aren't into graphic novels or knowledgeable about Latino or lowrider culture will appreciate some of the humor in the books, such as some of the cultural references like that to Cantinflas, and art that sometimes looks like Krazy Kat or Mad Magazine).  In Space, the protagonists get rid of a black hole with w(h)ite-out; and in Earth, Flappy describes igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks as "big dumb ignoramous rocks," "sedentary rocks....like napping at the beach," and "metaphoric rocks-these are the building blocks of poets everywhere!"


© Amanda Pape - 2017

[These books were borrowed from and returned to my local public library.]

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