Tuesday, July 18, 2017

750 (2017 #48). Victoria


by Daisy Goodwin,
read by Anna Wilson-Jones


I'd seen some bits of the PBS Masterpiece adaptation of Daisy Goodwin's novel about Great Britain's second-longest-reigning monarch as a young queen, so I was excited about listening to this audiobook.

Victoria is subtitled "A Novel of a Young Queen," and that it is.  It covers her life only from the age of 18, when she ascended to the throne, in 1837, to her engagement to Prince Albert of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha in October 1839.

In that time period, the politically inexperienced Queen Victoria came to rely quite a bit on her Prime Minister, Lord Melbourne.  The book highlights rumors that Victoria wanted to marry the widower, 40 years her senior, but I doubt that was true - I think she probably saw him more as a father figure, given that her own father died when she was a baby.  It does make for an interesting story, though.

While the Masterpiece series continues Victoria's relationship with Prince Albert after their marriage, the book stops with their engagement.  I have to say that the book didn't really sell me on an instant romance between the two - but that's why it's historical fiction, not a biography.  Still a great read.

British actress Anna Wilson-Jones reads the book with great gusto.   She also played the part of Emma Portman, one of Victoria's ladies-in-waiting and a friend of Melbourne, in the miniseries.


© Amanda Pape - 2017

[The e-audiobook was borrowed from and returned to my university library.]

Monday, July 10, 2017

749 (2017 #47). Plume

by Isabelle Simler


This simple book is about feathers - and a cat named Plume who likes to collect them.  The first 18 double-page spreads features one bird (and one word, the name of the bird), along with samples of its plumage - and some portion of the black cat.  The last two double-page spreads introduce and feature the cat.

The digital illustrations by French author Isabelle Simler are exquisite.  On the front and back endpapers, there are guides to 42 more bird feathers, along with a few stray cat hairs (or cat "feathers” if you will).  I could see this book being used in a lesson about birds or feathers.


© Amanda Pape - 2017

[I received this hardbound book through the LibraryThing Early Reviewers program.  It will be added to my university library's collection.]

Tuesday, July 04, 2017

748 (2017 #46). Fates and Traitors



by Jennifer Chiaverini

Although its subtitle is "A Novel of John Wilkes Booth," Fates and Traitors - like nearly all of Jennifer Chiaverini's books - is really about women.  In this case, four women whose lives were intricately tied to that of Lincoln's assassin:  his mother, Mary Ann Holmes Booth; his sister, Asia Booth Clarke; his supposed fiancee, Lucy Hale; and a co-conspirator, Mary Surratt.

The book opens with a prologue from Booth's viewpoint about his capture, in which he is shot and as he is slowly dying, he thinks of these four women.  Then his life's story is told through theirs in the next four chapters:  his early years (1838-1851) with his mother, who has an fascinating background; the years 1851-1864 from his older sister Asia's point of view (she later became a poet and writer); then 1864-1865 as seen by both fiancee Lucy (daughter and later wife of senators) and Mary Surratt (the first woman hung by the federal government for her part in the plot to kill Lincoln).

This is followed by a chapter in John's voice again, set in 1865, just after Lee's surrender at Appomattox.  The final chapters tell what happened to all four women in the rest of 1865, and end with Lucy in 1890.  I knew very little of any of these women, and found their stories to be the intriguing ones.  Telling the story this way, though, also adds to the mystique of Booth - because one can see how his words and actions sounded and appeared to others, yet still not be able to get fully inside his mind to fully understand his motivation to kill Lincoln.

The title comes from Shakespeare's play Julius Caesar, Act II, Scene III, the last line:

If thou read this, O Caesar, thou mayst live.
If not, the Fates with traitors do contrive.

A longer passage including this line is the epithet of the book, rather fitting for Booth, who apparently stated his favorite Shakespearean role was that of Brutus, Caesar's lead assassin.

Chiaverini provides a map at the beginning of the book marking relevant locations in Washington, D. C., and lists her sources in three pages of acknowledgements at the end of the book.  I liked this novel better than Chiaverini's other novels featuring Civil War era personages.


© Amanda Pape - 2017

[This book was borrowed from and returned to my local public library.]